Health Problems Associated with NuvaRing

The last decade has not been lucky for manufacturers and distributors of contraceptive products. Another large pharmaceutical company, Merck this time, is being sued by more of a dozen of its clients for failing to disclose the risks of using the contraceptive vaginal ring NuvaRing.

NuvaRing is a prescriptive flexible ring made of ethylene-vinyl acetate polymer that is placed in the vagina to inhibit ovulation and sperm penetration. As a contraceptive method, it is considered as effective but much more convenient than birth control pills. NuvaRing is left in the vagina in 3 week stretches, alternating with a rest of one week during which the user has her period. While the ring is in the vagina, it slowly releases small amounts of 120 µg of etonogestrel, a third generation progestin and 15 µg of ehinyl estradiol, a form of estrogen daily to prevent ovulation and theoretically implantation in the endometrium. According to Texas law firm Williams Kherkher, this particular combination of hormones has been found to be harmful to its users.

Studies conducted since 2002 when it was first marketed in the US, NuvaRing has been found to increase the risk of developing a serious blood clotting condition known as venous thrombosis by as much as 6.5 times. It is also thought to increase the risk of a pulmonary embolism as a blood clot that has dislodged and travelled to the lungs can serve to block an artery.

The main complaint of users that are slated to have their day in court in July 2013 is that Merck failed to adequately test the product before releasing it to the public, and to warn users about the risks associated with its use. Most of the plaintiffs are women who have suffered from the effects of blood clots or family members of women who have died alleging that the injuries or deaths had been directly caused by the use of NuvaRing. If you suspect that you are one or the other, consult with a defective pharmaceuticals lawyer in your area that has handled NuvaRing cases before. The specialized nature of federal multi-district litigation which NuvaRing cases has been classified under makes it the wisest course of action at this time.

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Woman Files Byetta Lawsuit after Husband Dies of Cancer

Adding to the extensive list of Byetta lawsuits, San Diego resident Rebecca Richard filed a suit on June 28 against drug manufacturers Amylin Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly on behalf of her husband, David Richard, who died of pancreatic cancer in 2011.

According to the website of Williams Kherker, Byetta, a popular medication for Type-2 diabetes since its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005, increases insulin secretion after meals, slows down the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and helps to reduce appetite. Patients with diabetes inject the medicine into their thigh, arm, or abdomen twice a day after meals. However, while the drug has been shown to effectively treat Type-2 diabetes, it has been linked to a number of side effects, ranging from inconveniences such as vomiting, diarrhea, and heartburn to possibly fatal conditions including pancreatic and thyroid cancer. Some Byetta users have also cited kidney damage and allergic reactions as side effects of the drug.

According to Richard’s suit, her husband was prescribed Byetta on July 27, 2005. He took the medication until May 2010, when he began experiencing sharp and intense abdominal pains. A little more than a year later, David Richard died after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Richard joins a number of other plaintiffs, including a group that filed for multidistrict litigation on April 5, who claim Byetta manufacturers provided inadequate information about the possible side effects and risks of the drug. If you or someone you know has developed a serious medical condition after taking Byetta, you may wish to contact an experienced attorney who can help you gain compensation for the injury.

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